[JPL] Mitcheltree CDs available for airplay

Dennis Mitcheltree dengor at pipeline.com
Thu Nov 30 12:17:37 EST 2006


Hi all!

I've enjoyed lurking and reading your posts for the last few weeks  
after being made aware of the JPL.
Just wanted to let you know that I have 2 recent CD releases  
available for airplay and would be happy send out copies to  
interested radio stations. Unfortunately I don't have the financial  
resources to flood stations with unsolicited copies so please get in  
touch with me if you would like me to send them to you.

Dennis Mitcheltree
dengor at pipeline.com
718.874.6769

You can listen to 30 second samples and view a one-sheet pdf of each  
CD at:
http://www.dennismitcheltree.com/discographie/index.html

Dennis Mitchel3, Tenor Of The Times: jazz & political discourse 2004 
(released Oct 1, 2006)
dennismitcheltree.com DCD041028
Recent review by Nic Jones:
http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=23658

Dennis Mitcheltree, Union(released Dec 1, 2005)
dennismitcheltree.com DCD990608
Review for JazzUSA.com:
Dennis Mitcheltree
UNION  by John Barrett
Some people know the traditions; some people know what to do with  
them. A familiar sound creeps through "Flatbush Blues": that delicate  
Lester Young tenor, intoned by Dennis Mitcheltree. A tiny bit edgy,  
the tune has the tough nervousness you get from Thelonious Monk.  
Johannes Wallmann stays silent on Dennis' solo, as Monk often did -  
until the Coltrane quote, when he soars like Tyner. "Mosinee Mayhem"  
is a scream -ragged and restless, the notes skitter everyplace.  
Hardly mainstream, but not avant-garde; while the tone belongs to  
Dennis, the mood is pure Booker Ervin. Listen close to the drums;  
Bill McClellan is hypnotic. His beat is fierce on "Waiting for  
Oyarsa", and Mitcheltree talks tough. His tone becomes pungent,  
metallic; sort of a cross between Trane and Joe Henderson. Wallmann  
sketches airy chords, wrapped in sustain; Dennis honks hard and  
captures the 'Sixties spirit. Yes sir, this is my kind of nostalgia.

"The Rabbi" hangs out by the street corner: there's acute boppish  
theme, and a very wicked bass line. Dennis is sweet like an alto …  
plus a few surprising screams. He's plaintive on Ellington's  
"Fleurette Africaine", strolling through a maze of percussion.  
McClellan is at his best, and Wallmann shows a sweet sophistication.  
"Time After Time" is a great little ballad (Dennis coasts; Johannes  
sparkles) and the past comes to life on "Set Me As…". Bowed bass, an  
intro direct from "A Love Supreme", and grandiose drums - all  
shouting with joyful regret. Warm but sad, you'll remember it fondly,  
with the rest of the album. Inside you'll find discipline, history,  
and a whole lot of heart.

You can also see a video of the upcoming 'Tenor Of the Times' DVD  
release at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lq89CStKJqQ

Thanks, looking forward to hearing from you!

Peace,
Dennis Mitcheltree
285 Fifth Avenue #209
Brooklyn NY 11215 USA

718.874.6769 main
917.498.9100 mobile

dengor at pipeline.com
http://www.dennismitcheltree.com
http://www.myspace.com/dennismitcheltree
http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=dennismitcheltreecom

"Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little  
security will deserve neither and lose both." - Benjamin Franklin

"No people ever recognize their dictator in advance. He never stands  
for election on the platform of dictatorship. He always represents  
himself as the instrument [of] the Incorporated National Will. ...  
When our dictator turns up you can depend on it that he will be one  
of the boys, and he will stand for everything traditionally American.  
And nobody will ever say "Heil" to him, nor will they call him  
"Führer" or "Duce." But they will greet him with one great big,  
universal, democratic, sheeplike bleat of "O.K., Chief! Fix it like  
you wanna, Chief! Oh Kaaaay!" - Dorothy Thompson, 1935

"Liberty lies in the hearts of men and women; when it dies there, no  
constitution, no law, no court can save it." - Judge Learned Hand

"I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much  
liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it." - Thomas  
Jefferson, 1791




More information about the jazzproglist mailing list