[JPL] Why is there so much product if jazz is such a small % ofindustry

Jackson, Bobby Bobby.Jackson at ideastream.org
Fri Sep 14 13:35:41 EDT 2007


I think you know why Arturo....  We ALL know why.  The answers are ugly
and those answers will put a lot of people out of business.  First,
there is quality music out there and a lot of it is played at CPN but, I
have so much crap on my desk and I hear from a lot of record reps that
tell me it is the best thing since Kind Of Blue however....Yeah,
right... (You know who you are and a hit dog will bark).

The glut of reissues, of good product has also taken time away from new
artists that perhaps can revitalize the sound of jazz.  It's a double
edged sword in that case.  I mean, you want the product and you want to
tell your audience that it's back out and available but........ 

Music that doesn't even fit what we play are sent to us by marketers;
stuff that we can't use (sometimes multiple copies through multiple
mailings, what a waste and I got five more today) but they're making a
buck off their clientele, knowing full well it won't get played on
certain stations; stations they continue to ask for airplay.  

As much as I hate to not give everyone a fair listen but I gotta tell
you, it's not as much fun as it used to be in the days of reviewing
vinyl where you got less product.  I was happy if I got twenty-five
titles in a month compared to the 30 per week I currently get (and less
programming hours to fit it in).  CD technology has made recording
easier (not necessarily better) and that's where the glut began, I
believe. The glut is also fracturing our jazz radio in a million
directions and choking the life out of our format.

You don't want to take the chance on missing something brilliant so you
wind up listening to way more disks than you should.  It's
counterproductive.  

That being said, here's one suggestion.  I wish that more record
companies would just send mp3 samples of their music that I can click on
and listen to at my desk. Particularly with new and untested artists.
If I'm interested I'll ask for the CD via email.  If I'm not interested,
I don't have to have it lingering on my desk, taking up space and
collecting dust or better still, thrown in the garbage with the rest of
my trash.  It would save record companies money in product, one sheets
and postage.  It would definitely save me time.  Thank you ECM for using
this technique!!

I have more thoughts about this but I will stop here.  Like Richard
Rodgers once wrote, "I Could Write A Book."  I'm sure there are more
thoughts about this.  I'll just sit on the fence and watch the parade.

Bobby Jackson
WCPN-FM/Cleveland, OH


-----Original Message-----
From: jazzproglist-bounces at jazzweek.com
[mailto:jazzproglist-bounces at jazzweek.com] On Behalf Of Arturo
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2007 4:08 PM
To: jazzproglist at jazzweek. com
Subject: [JPL] Why is there so much product if jazz is such a small %
ofindustry

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We all know that jazz is appx 3% of the total music industry as it is in
the
output of radio. I for one although knowing jazz is not intended for the
masses would like to see that % rise. That said with the virtual
elimination
of jazz by the major labels, their dropping of so many stand out names
from
their roster,  why is it we are receiving more product than ever before?
Blaise Lantana asked to curtail female jazz vocalists releases, I
concur,
however it should not stop there. Wouldn't less recordings be more
effective
in elevating the genre in sales and performances? Is having 75 CDs on
one's
desk to review a good thing? I have stated this before and will repeat,
jazz89KUVO has over 130 hours of jazz a week yet we can not even get
close
to being able to play 1/2 of what we get. The majority of other radio
outlets have far less amounts of jazz programming a week, if we can not
handle the amount of music we get, how do others with 20 or 30 or even
50
hours of jazz cope with it?

Arturo

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