[JPL] 50 great moments in jazz

Eric Jackson eric-jackson at comcast.net
Mon Jan 26 13:07:15 EST 2009


Jackson, Bobby wrote:

> I've interviewed Professor Karlton Hester years ago who himself is a
> musician. He is an ethnomusicologist who teaches at San Francisco State
> University, I believe. It was a thoroughly fascinating conversation and
> account of many issues regarding this music.


I've spoken to Professor Hester at several IAJE conferences. In fact, he 
gave a talk at one of the IAJE conferences. I have the 4 volume set he 
wrote called From Africa To Afrocentric Innovations Some Call Jazz. I 
have read the first volume. It is an extremely interesting read.

Eric Jackson
Mon - Thurs 8 pm - mid.
89.7 FM WGBH Boston
www.wgbh.org/jazz


> 
> Aloha,
> 
> Bobby Jackson
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: jazzproglist-bounces at jazzweek.com
> [mailto:jazzproglist-bounces at jazzweek.com] On Behalf Of Jae Sinnett
> Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 11:58 AM
> To: jazzproglist at jazzweek.com
> Subject: Re: [JPL] 50 great moments in jazz
> 
> This week's sponsor: 
> Trefzger Media -- Web 2.0 Design/Development
> Web site, e-commerce, blogs: full design and development services
> available.
> http://www.trefzgermedia.com/
> -----
> 
> 
> "It's an irony - though perhaps an unsurprising one - that music derived
> from the traditions of African slaves should have been first recorded by
> a white band. But if the Original Dixieland Jazz Band made history more
> through luck than judgment, and if many better players from New Orleans'
> black community - Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Sidney Bechet and
> Louis Armstrong - were to find recognition later, the group nonetheless
> captured jazz's unruly energy and youthful eagerness."
> 
> While certainly an informative piece of work here I continue to be
> amazed at the credit given to the ODJB as the first to record "jass."
> That's very debatable. Why James Reese Europe is continuously ignored is
> puzzling although my guess is that it could have something to do with
> jazz not being identified as such in 1912 or 1913...when he first made
> recordings for the Victor Talking Machine Company. His music was clearly
> blues based (unlike the ODJB) and extended ragtime's rhythmic concepts
> and contained improvisation. Sounds like jazz to me and those that know
> the history agreed. It's time this man got his due...in the jazz
> community. 
> 
> Jae Sinnett 
> 
> 
> --- On Mon, 1/26/09, Jazz Promo Services <jazzpromo at earthlink.net>
> wrote:
> 
>> From: Jazz Promo Services <jazzpromo at earthlink.net>
>> Subject: [JPL] 50 great moments in jazz
>> To: "jazzproglist at jazzweek.com" <jazzproglist at jazzweek.com>
>> Date: Monday, January 26, 2009, 11:26 AM
>> This week's sponsor:
>> Trefzger Media -- Web 2.0 Design/Development
>> Web site, e-commerce, blogs: full design and development
>> services available.
>> http://www.trefzgermedia.com/
>> -----
>>
>>
>>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2009/jan/26/original-dixieland
> -jaz
>> z-band
>>
>> For the first installment in a new series, John Fordham
>> explains why Livery
>> Stable Blues was the fanfare for a revolution
>>
>> The world first heard about a strange new music called
>> "jazz" in 1917.
>> Although this hybrid of brass-band, street-strutting blues,
>> African dance
>> rhythms, mutated European classical forms, funeral marches
>> and ragtime had
>> been developing during the previous decade, it took that
>> long for the
>> recording technology of the day to catch up and capture its
>> sound.
>>
>> After only a few years of those first clattery and raucous
>> jazz recordings
>> hitting the streets, 'the jazz age' dawned and
>> dancers started moving to a
>> more urgent and ecstatic beat - a feeling quite different
>> from the discreet
>> and elegant European styles that had previously ruled the
>> floors.
>>
>> Over the next 50 weeks, I'm going to highlight landmark
>> moments that were
>> not only transitional points in the history of jazz, but in
>> the history of
>> modern music. There is no more engrossing story in the
>> music of the 20th and
>> early 21st centuries than that of jazz, an artform that has
>> changed the way
>> we move, speak and sing. Jazz has achieved so many things:
>> it has borrowed
>> from European classical music and helped reinvigorate it,
>> it has provided
>> the vital ingredients of rock'n'roll, it has broken
>> barriers in instrumental
>> technique, rehabilitated improvisation from the bad
>> publicity the classical
>> establishment had given it, and, in its way, helped global
>> interracial
>> understanding.
>>
>> Regarding that last point, it's an irony - though
>> perhaps an unsurprising
>> one - that music derived from the traditions of African
>> slaves should have
>> been first recorded by a white band. But if the Original
>> Dixieland Jazz Band
>> made history more through luck than judgment, and if many
>> better players
>> from New Orleans' black community - Jelly Roll Morton,
>> King Oliver, Sidney
>> Bechet and Louis Armstrong - were to find recognition
>> later, the group
>> nonetheless captured jazz's unruly energy and youthful
>> eagerness.
>>
>> Livery Stable Blues is one of the first hits from a group
>> of enthusiasts
>> whose sound had been informed by the New Orleans
>> street-band musician Papa
>> Jack Laine and Louis Armstrong's mentor, the cornetist
>> Joe "King" Oliver.
>> The track was recorded in February 1917, after the the
>> band's slapstick
>> comedy had thrilled crowds at New York"s
>> Reisenweber's restaurant. The
>> record sold over a million copies, and turned jazz into a
>> national craze.
>> Cornetist Nick LaRocca, clarinetist Larry Shields,
>> trombonist Eddie Edwards,
>> pianist Henry Ragas and drummer Tony Sbarbaro have become
>> footnotes in jazz
>> history, and the sound they made seems rhythmically clunky
>> and predictable
>> today. But as the fanfare for a revolution (in a
>> revolutionary year) Livery
>> Stable Blues will never be forgotten.
>> --
>>
>> Jazz Programmers' Mailing List:
>> jazzproglist at jazzweek.com
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>> Sponsorship information: jplsponsor at jazzweek.com
> 
> 
>       
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> 
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