[JPL] Experts talk on the state of jazz in Las Vegas

Jackson, Bobby Bobby.Jackson at ideastream.org
Thu Jul 16 01:21:39 EDT 2009


I was hooked on jazz before I knew what it was.  I was about two and listening to Frank Sinatra, Nat Cole and Dave Brubeck among others. It came from my grandparents home and my Dad and Uncle's record collections first.. Then it came from the radio as a very young boy.  

There are not as many jazz stations today and kids don't hear it except in passing in movies (i.e. Wall-E) or on commercials on late night TV a la P Diddy's take on Sinatra selling his Ciroc Vodka or Freddy Cole singing a song around some sophisticate product.  Most people don't even realize they're hearing jazz.  

It's interesting to me that the jazz stations are on the opposite end of the radio dial from the pop and hip-hop stations.  How many kids actually will turn their dial below 92 to hear music these days?  Deeper still, how many kids listen to the radio?  In my day we had boom boxes blaring in the streets and in the parks with jazz and other music.  Today, everyone walks around with i-pod headphones with music they've selected from God knows where?  

With the big push today of quick cuts, the loud, fast food, throw away mentality and disposable this and that the music is caught up and lost in a cacophony of cultural flash.  This is music that requires people who actually have attention spans.  They are people out there but it is a different world.  I don't think the music is doomed but this is a different world....

Aloha,

Bobby Jackson

-----Original Message-----
From: jazzproglist-bounces at jazzweek.com [mailto:jazzproglist-bounces at jazzweek.com] On Behalf Of Jae Sinnett
Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2009 12:19 AM
To: jazzproglist at jazzweek.com
Subject: Re: [JPL] Experts talk on the state of jazz in Las Vegas


Ron,

"Jazz" is as profound, visionary, exhilarating, soulful, creative, introspective, aggressive, thought provoking, expressive, mind bending, swinging, passionate, challenging, heartfelt, sophisticated, touching, sincere and interesting as ever. Yep, "jazz" is doing just fine. Now if we can figure out a way to get this through to folks with the attention span of a lightening bolt we might be on to something. 

Jae Sinnett

--- On Wed, 7/15/09, ron-gill at att.net <ron-gill at att.net> wrote:

> From: ron-gill at att.net <ron-gill at att.net>
> Subject: Re: [JPL] Experts talk on the state of jazz in Las Vegas
> To: jazzproglist at jazzweek.com
> Date: Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 11:56 PM
> 
> On Jul 15, 2009, at 10:55 PM, Dr. Jazz wrote:
> 
> > Interesting comment from the smooth jazzer: 
> "...what jazz was and what jazz needs to become..."
> > -Dr.
> 
>    If this is the only thing this panel
> could conclude from their symposium, well,they are not
> saying anything
>    new. Same old comments about educating
> students (young people ) early, what jazz was and is today,
>    and the old comment about jazz being an
> art form and we should preserve it. OK...now what? Any
> ideas
>    on how you stop the bleeding?
>    All of us, involved in this music,
> producing it, airing it, promoting it, etc. have the
> responsibility  to come
>    up with the answers.
>    First thing, all of us mature guys on JPL
> remember when listening to the radio back in the day, all
> the music
>    was played on radio stations and
> programs. Alongside Brubeck or Shearing we heard Sinatra and
> Laine.
>    It was a mix of Spike Jones and Duke.
> That is how the listener learned about all the music that
> was
>    available to them. Then, they chose what
> they liked. Everything today is programmed to a small
> segment
>    of the listening audience, and we know
> what that audience is hearing. It isn't that all of it is
> bad, it's just
>    that they have no idea of the vast amount
> of quality music that is out there for them to chose from.
>    That is where the discussion should
> start. How do you program music in as wide a spectrum that
> you can
>    and still maintain a quality of music
> that the listener can hook onto.
>    Ideas?  Let's talk about that.
>    Ron Gill
>    Singer/consultant
>    Charlotte, NC
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> > 
> > 
> > Experts talk on the state of jazz in Las Vegas
> > Jazz symposium evokes comments about saving jazz as
> art form
> > By Jerry Fink (contact)
> > 
> > Wednesday, July 15, 2009 | 1:47 p.m.
> > 
> > During a symposium earlier this year, a panel of
> experts spoke on the fate of jazz in Las Vegas. Here are
> some of their comments:
> > 
> > Vincent Falcone, long-time music director for Frank
> Sinatra: "I remember Frank Sinatra once saying to me, 'If
> you only play the notes, it doesn't mean a thing.' You've
> got to have soul, dynamics, ups and downs. That's what the
> greatest jazz musicians do naturally, instinctively. ...
> What we need today is the support of those of us who really
> love jazz. Get out and support the musicians."
> > 
> > David Loeb, director of jazz studies at UNLV: "This is
> a jazz town, or at least it was. I believe it still is.
> There is certainly an undercurrent, an optimism for
> continuing the art form. That's what we're trying to do at
> the university -- we're trying to perpetuate the art form of
> jazz and also to prepare students to go out and make a
> living. Jazz is our cultural art form, and we need to
> preserve it."
> > 
> > John Nasshan, drummer and host of a jazz program on
> KUNV 91.5-FM: "Jazz is the only true American art form and
> we don't treat it well. Once you get involved in jazz at any
> level, you don't lose the love for it. We need to support
> the art form, but we're not doing it. "
> > 
> > Frank Leone, president of the Las Vegas Jazz Society
> and Musicians Union Local 369: "We grew up with songs that
> easily became accessible to jazz, but not today. It's all
> hip-hop, and Clear Channel owns every radio station in
> America and it's not going to give you a choice. Today kids
> aren't being exposed to jazz till they get to junior high
> school, and all of a sudden have a music appreciation class
> in jazz and classical. It's too late -- way too late. We
> have to get them early."
> > 
> > Dana Crawford, smooth jazz deejay with KOAS 105.7-FM:
> "If we don't build a bridge between what jazz was and what
> jazz needs to become it's going to die here. We need to find
> a way for the art form to evolve and become something people
> in their 20s and 30s will want to come out and see. If we
> don't educate the young about what was and also expose them
> to what is, jazz is going to die. It has nowhere to go."
> > 
> > --Dr. Jazz
> > Dr. Jazz Operations
> > 24270 Eastwood
> > Oak Park, MI  48237
> > (248) 542-7888
> > http://www.drjazz.com
> > SKYPE:  drjazz99
> > 
> > --
> > 
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