[JPL] Record Stores

George Thomas jazz at vpr.net
Thu Apr 1 16:52:38 EDT 2010


My first purchases were at a TV/furniture store in Guilford CT where they
were phasing out their LP's and I was able to pick up two unknown but
great releases: Miles Davis/Gil Evans "Miles Ahead" and Sarah Vaughan's
"Swingin' Easy" for $1.19 each. My taste for cut-outs or rather DJ copies
continued
at Cutler's in New Haven CT where they had booths to hang out & listen
for hours. (Damn whoever invented shrink-wrap!) In the back of the store
were the 45's (including jazz) and my education continued.
I later worked at Briggs & Briggs in Cambridge, MA where, amazingly
enough, they didn't have any in-store play system and I learned to
describe the
records I knew and bull about the one's I didn't. Bill Nowlin, one of the
owners of Rounder Records came in a lot, trading Aunt Molly Jackson Lp's
for contemporary country (circa 1974) and I ended up as a salesperson
selling on the road & at festivals for Rounder from a catalog of
distributed
record labels that included Soul Note, Black Saint, Nessa, Delmark, El
Saturn (Sun Ra's own label - I believe we were the only distributors at
the time), Nessa, Flying Fish, Shanachie, Red, Folkways, Alligator, Herwin
and some 400 other labels, not all jazz. I sold to great independent
record stores all over the country including Waterloo (Austin), Main
Street (Northampton Ma), For The Record (Amherst, MA), Elderly
(E.Lansing), etc, etc. Great times and I miss walking into a store and
having a friend behind the counter saying "ya gotta hear this!"

Gotta get that book.

George

-- 
Jazz In The Evening with George Thomas
Vermont Public Radio
365 Troy Ave
Colchester, VT 05446

802-654-4343
jazz at vpr.net
www.vpr.net
Mon-Thu 9-11pm, Fri 10pm-mid

>
> Here in Greenville we had a store where you could play the music on a
> turntable.  They had salesmen who came around every other week or
> monthly with DEMO LPs for them to listen to prior to making their
> orders.  In those days I was the big Jazz Kid and often times the
> salesmen would leave me JAZZ DEMOS for my young collection.  I did get
> some great music that way. This same store sold audio equipment and that
> is where I purchased my first two systems.  Also Kemp's Records in
> Chapel Hill had the listening booths where you actually took the LPs
> into the booth and played them. What a wonderful way to audition music.
> I think I often spent my food money on LPs there while at UNC.  ALOHA
> Tom
>
> Paul Combs wrote:
>>
>> I remember, growing up in Philadelphia, being about the same age 13-14
>> and buying my first jazz records in similar stores. Some like a
>> couple  up on Market Street, would play a track for you on the house
>> system, others like Sam Goody on 15th Street hat the booths like those
>> Steve remembers. What nice memories this thread brings up.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Paul
>>
>> Steve Schwartz wrote:
>>> I started buying jazz LPs wile a teenager in Southern California in
>>> the late 1950s.
>>> One of my favorites places to do so was Wallach's Music City at the
>>> corner of
>>> Sunset and Vine.
>>> They actually had a row of small listening booths where you could
>>> take a few LPs
>>> into and listen in privacy. This is before shrink wrapping.
>>> The booths had huge glass windows so you could see out onto the street.
>>> One occasion stands out to this day. I don't remember the album I was
>>> listening to,
>>> but as I looked out the window while listening, walking by me on
>>> Sunset was
>>> Gerry Mulligan. I knocked on the glass to get his attention, held up
>>> the album cover,
>>> indicating that I was a jazz fan. Gerry waved and gave me a big smile
>>> and continued
>>> walking past me.
>>> I'm 15 or 16 years old.
>>> What a thrill!


-- 
Jazz In The Evening with George Thomas
Vermont Public Radio
365 Troy Ave
Colchester, VT 05446

802-654-4343
jazz at vpr.net
www.vpr.net
Mon-Thu 9-11pm, Fri 10pm-mid


-- 
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