[JPL] Fwd: FW: save the word schmuck

Russell Haines russjazzworld at gmail.com
Thu Apr 29 15:51:24 EDT 2010


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Drefcinski, Kyle <Kyle.Drefcinski at asm.ca.gov>
Date: Thu, Apr 29, 2010 at 12:40 PM
Subject: FW: save the word schmuck
To: "russjazzworld at gmail.com" <russjazzworld at gmail.com>


 Had to send this to you from my work email to make sure you got the pics!


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*From:* Rothstein, Neal
*Sent:* Thursday, April 29, 2010 10:31 AM
*To:* Stiger, Russell; Drefcinski, Kyle; Cardenas, Boris
*Subject:* FW: save the word schmuck



*Subject:* FW: save the word schmuck





*Mel Brooks Starts Nonprofit Foundation To Save Word 'Schmuck' *


NEW YORK-Saying he could no longer stand idly by while a vital part of
American culture is lost forever, activist and Broadway producer Mel Brooks
has founded a private nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving the
word "schmuck."




An emotional Brooks stopped short of kvetching at a schmuck fundraiser
Monday.

 "Schmuck is dying," a sober Brooks said during a 2,000-person rally held in
his hometown of Williamsburg, Brooklyn Monday. "For many of us, saying
'schmuck' is a way of life. Yet when I walk down the street and see people
behaving in foolish, pathetic, or otherwise schmucky ways, I hear only the
words 'prick' and 'douche bag.' I just shake my head and think, 'I don't
want to live in a world like this.'"

 The nonprofit, Schmucks For Schmuck, has compiled schmuck-related data from
the past 80 years and conducted its own independent research on contemporary
"schmuck" usage. According to Brooks, the statistics are frightening:
Utterances of the word "schmuck" have declined every year since its peak in
1951, and in 2006, the word was spoken a mere 28 times -17 of these times by
Brooks himself. The study indicates that today, when faced with a situation
in which one can use a targeted or self-deprecating insult to convey a
general feeling of disgust, people are 50 times more likely to use the word
"jerk" than "schmuck," 100 times more likely to use "dick," and 15,000 times
more likely to use "fucking asshole."

 Perhaps more startling, only 23 percent of men know what schmuck means, and
only 1..2 percent of these men are under the age of 78. If such trends
continue, Brooks estimates that by 2011, such lesser-used terms as
"imbecile," "dummy," "schlub," and "contemptible ne'er-do-well" will all
surpass schmuck, which is projected to completely disappear by the year 2020
or whenever Brooks dies.

 "We must save this word!" Brooks said to thunderous applause as those in
attendance began chanting "Schmuck! Schmuck! Schmuck!" "How will we be able
to charmingly describe someone who acts in an inappropriate manner?
Especially given the tragic loss of the word 'schmegeggie' in 2001. So I
urge you: Tonight, when you get home, please, call up your family, your
friends, your loved ones, and tell them they're a bunch of schmucks."





 Hundreds turned out at a Boca Raton, Florida, demonstration to show their
support for the dying word.

  "I've never told anyone this before," Brooks added, choking back tears,
"but my father was a schmuck."

 The foundation has already raised more than $20 million, thanks to
donations from supporters such as Jackie Mason, Albert Brooks, the Schtupp
Institute, Sen. Russ Feingold (D-WI), and the Henny Youngman Endowment for
the Preservation of Schmekel. The money will go toward projects aimed at
reintegrating "schmuck" into the English lexicon, including billboards and
flyers plastered with the word "schmuck," the upcoming 5K Schlep for Schmuck
Awareness, and a new Mel Brooks film.

 "The world cannot afford to lose this valuable and versatile word," Brooks
told reporters during a charity auction in Manhattan's Upper West Side
Tuesday, where attendees bid for the chance to have a private lunch with
Brooks and repeatedly call him a schmuck. "You can be a poor schmuck, a lazy
schmuck, a dumb schmuck, or just a plain old schmuck.. A group of people can
be collectively referred to as schmucks. You can call someone a schmuck, and
you can be called a schmuck. You can even call yourself a schmuck."

 "Plus, it's just so fun to say," Brooks added. "Schmuck."  Many of the
foundation's volunteers say they share Brooks' passion for the word
"schmuck," as well as his outrage that it is slowly disappearing from
everyday use. They claim that if they do not act now, the trend could create
a snowball effect.

 "Today its schmuck, tomorrow it might be toochis," said SFS volunteer Harry
Steinbergmann, 82. "What's next, schlemiel? Putz? Schlimazel?"
 Steinbergmann went on to classify this scenario as 'farcockteh'.






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<http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?tile=multiaccount&ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_4>







-- 
Russ Haines
Jazz/World Music Director
WWSP 90fm
1608 Reserve Street
Stevens Point, WI. 54481
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