[JPL] Marc Myers on the jazz audience

Jae Sinnett jaejazz at yahoo.com
Sat Jan 28 12:00:50 EST 2012


Thanks Ed. In reference to radio programming....and to your point...we use the OMT automation system. I program my show by putting all of the music in the four one hour blocks for my show as a set up. Once my show starts I do the voice tracks live until I leave. One of the interesting features is that in each of the hour blocks I have it set to pull randomly selections from the jazz categories. In other words when I go to program my show the four hour blocks are already filled with music and I make the adjustments where need be. I do this because many times the computer will pull things I didn't think of. If it pulls something I don't want to play I simply delete it. My point to saying all of this is that many, many times during the show I've changed a selection and replaced it with something else because the flow didn't feel right.
 
I think once you start to feel these things you are making that connection because I believe we also represent to a degree what the audience feels too. If you're uncomfortable with something playing while you're in that chair chances are many listerner's are too. Same with the positive. I've also gotten to a place with listening to jazz that if I can't remember what an artist is doing with...melody, rhythm...anything that brings me back to their music...over time...the listerner's definitely won't make the connection either. How much of today's jazz can you remember a month down the road? Two months?  It's about what makes music meaningful. One example...the new Josh Rzepka recording. The title track "Into the Night"...has a melodic structure that you can hum along with and remember. Those types of things in the music are what makes the connections with listeners. Mendoza's CD...you listen to those songs a few times and they'll be in your
 coconut for a while. 
 
I think these things make the music more "compelling." As a point of reference anyway. The other more esoteric point is when the music plays the artist instead of the artist playing the music. Too often the musicians are trying to make things happen with the music and insisting on making musical points when there is no need to. At that point the music becomes an intellectual exercise or contrived sounding. My opinion of course but if the music is treated like it has a life of it's own and if we can recognize this...the experience for our listeners will be considerably better. 
 
Jae    


________________________________
From: Ed Trefzger <ed.trefzger at jazzweek.com>
To: jazzproglist at jazzweek.com 
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 11:28 AM
Subject: Re: [JPL] Marc Myers on the jazz audience

THIS WEEK'S SPONSOR: The JazzWeek relaunch -- JazzWeek 2.0 -- crowdfunding project has launched. Visit http://www.indiegogo.com/jazzweek for more information. Become part of the solution.

---

Jae,

You are the sort of artist I had in mind as someone who cares and does it right! I think the difference is having a desire to connect with the audience and not having that desire. You are clearly someone who wants to communicate to the audience and reach them and you are someone who has done that and is doing that well. So I think the point I wanted to share from Marc was less about deciding or discovering what the formula is and more about wanting to make the connection. 

On the radio side, making that connection is important as well. Why is what you are playing compelling? What about the artist should the audience care about? Why did you put the music together in the way you did? Are you relating to what the audience is doing at that moment -- getting ready for work, driving, working, eating, sitting back in a chair and listening? Are you their companion and guide or just someone talking "at" them?

Ed

On Jan 28, 2012, at 11:05 AM, Jae Sinnett wrote:

> THIS WEEK'S SPONSOR: The JazzWeek relaunch -- JazzWeek 2.0 -- crowdfunding project has launched. Visit http://www.indiegogo.com/jazzweek for more information. Become part of the solution.
> 
> ---
> 
> What's the saying Ed...One man's junk is another man's treasure. Marc's quote is totally subjective but I get his point. I've been on stage performing something and the audience loves it. So I think....hmmm...we have to do that again tomorrow night. It didn't work as well. Why? That's a question that no musician, writer, educator, fortune teller, etc...can answer in definitive terms. It can only be speculative. It's extremely complex and it's no different than what we do from the broadcasting chair. Those of us that have been in that chair for years understand and "feel" your audience. You can feel when you're really connecting and when you're not. What makes that happen? There are a confluence of things that have to merge at that moment for it to work and no one has the majestic answer as to what they all are and how to merge them on the dime. You can develop a level of consistency with the process based on what has worked in the past. If someone
> came up with a concoction that we artists/entertainers, etc...could drink and make us connect with the audience everytime out of the gate...that person would easily be in the 1%.
>  
> Jae Sinnett 
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: Ed Trefzger <ed.trefzger at jazzweek.com>
> To: JPL List <jazzproglist at jazzweek.com> 
> Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 10:33 AM
> Subject: [JPL] Marc Myers on the jazz audience
> 
> THIS WEEK'S SPONSOR: The JazzWeek relaunch -- JazzWeek 2.0 -- crowdfunding project has launched. Visit http://www.indiegogo.com/jazzweek for more information. Become part of the solution.
> 
> ---
> 
> If you don't read Marc Myers' JazzWax blog regularly, you're missing out on a lot. Today's is particularly worth reading as he tackles the issue of the jazz audience and how musicians relate to it. I think it's applicable to radio programmers as well and how radio thinks about and treats the music.
> 
> A quote:
> 
> If the form of jazz you play is that style known as "your own thing," don't be shocked when the audience for your music remains small or shrinks. I'm not advocating that musicians sell out or play corporate events (many do). I'm just asking that they think a little more about their audiences as listeners with eclectic tastes, not judgmental hipsters or low-culture dummies who need to be rehabilitated or transformed.
> 
> Despite what professors tell young musicians today, your "own thing" should be about loving your audiences and entertaining them with art, giving them a chance to stop thinking for an evening and feel their hearts. Noise isn't art. And as many jazz musicians are discovering, noise doesn't tend to pay well either. 
> 
> http://www.jazzwax.com/2012/01/weekend-wax-bits-3.html
> 
> --
> 
> Jazz Programmers' Mailing List: jazzproglist at jazzweek.com
> List information: http://lists.jazzweek.com/mailman/listinfo/jazzproglist
> List archive: http://lists.jazzweek.com/pipermail/jazzproglist/
> Sponsorship information: jplsponsor at jazzweek.com
> 
> 
> --
> 
> Jazz Programmers' Mailing List: jazzproglist at jazzweek.com
> List information: http://lists.jazzweek.com/mailman/listinfo/jazzproglist
> List archive: http://lists.jazzweek.com/pipermail/jazzproglist/
> Sponsorship information: jplsponsor at jazzweek.com



--

Jazz Programmers' Mailing List: jazzproglist at jazzweek.com
List information: http://lists.jazzweek.com/mailman/listinfo/jazzproglist
List archive: http://lists.jazzweek.com/pipermail/jazzproglist/
Sponsorship information: jplsponsor at jazzweek.com


More information about the jazzproglist mailing list