[JPL] Tina Brooks

Tom Mallison tomthejazzman at embarqmail.com
Fri Jun 1 16:03:25 EDT 2012


Here is more on Tine I found on line.

Brooks is best known for his work forBlue Note Records 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Note_Records>between 1958 and 1961, 
recording primarily as a sideman withKenny Burrell 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenny_Burrell>,Freddie Hubbard 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freddie_Hubbard>,Jackie McLean 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_McLean>,Freddie Redd 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freddie_Redd>, andJimmy Smith 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Smith_%28musician%29>. Around the 
same period, Brooks was McLean's understudy in/The Connection 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Connection_%281959_play%29>/, a play 
byJack Gelber <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Gelber>with music by 
Redd, and performed on an album of music from the play on the Felsted Label.

Brooks recorded five sessions of his own for Blue Note (including one 
jointly with McLean). The first session was recorded on 16 March 1958 at 
theVan Gelder Studio 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Gelder_Studio>inHackensack, New Jersey 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hackensack,_New_Jersey>, and featured 
promising young trumpeterLee Morgan 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Morgan>alongside seasoned 
professionals such asSonny Clark 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonny_Clark>,Doug Watkins 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_Watkins>andArt Blakey 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Blakey>. Despite the calibre of the 
players and the quality of the output,/Minor Move 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minor_Move>/was not released for more than 
two decades, long after Brooks had died. This started an unfortunate 
trend, as three of his four other sessions (/Street Singer 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_Singer>/,/Back to the Tracks 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back_to_the_Tracks>/and/The Waiting Game 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Waiting_Game>/) did not appear during 
his lifetime. The exception was/True Blue 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/True_Blue_%28Tina_Brooks_Album%29>/, a 
session recorded on 25 June 1960 withFreddie Hubbard 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freddie_Hubbard>,Duke Jordan 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_Jordan>,Sam Jones 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Jones>andArt Taylor 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Taylor>. The release of/True 
Blue/coincided with the release of Hubbard's Blue Note debut album,/Open 
Sesame 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Sesame_%28Freddie_Hubbard_album%29>/(also 
featuring Brooks), and was not actively promoted.^[3] 
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tina_Brooks#cite_note-2>

Brooks did not record after 1961. Plagued by heroin dependency, and 
gradually deteriorating health, he died of liver failure aged just 42.


    [edi
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tina_Brooks&action=edit&section=3>




On 6/1/2012 3:49 PM, Nou Dadoun wrote:
> There's a great Mosaic box of his complete Blue Note recordings mainly his
> own True Blue and Back to the Tracks along with some sessions with Jackie
> McLean - his recordings as a leader were impossible to find til the Mosaic
> box came out then Blue Note reissued them, highly recommended; did he
> record for anybody else? ... N
>
> On Fri, Jun 1, 2012 at 12:41 PM, Tom Mallison
> <tomthejazzman at embarqmail.com>wrote:
>
>> Thought many of you might not be familiar with Tina Brooks or even thought
>> it was a female.
>>
>> Harold Floyd Brooks was born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, and was the
>> brother of David "Bubba" Brooks. The nickname *"Tina"*, pronounced Teena,
>> was a variation of *"Teeny"*, a childhood moniker. His favorite tune was
>> "My Devotion".  Initially, he studied the C-melody saxophone, which he
>> began playing the shortly after he moved to New York with his family in
>> 1944. Brooks' first professional work came in 1951 with rhythm and blues
>> pianist Sonny Thompson, and, in 1955, Brooks played with vibraphonist
>> Lionel Hampton.  Brooks also received less formal guidance from trumpeter
>> and composer "Little" Benny Harris, who led the saxophonist to his first
>> recording as a leader. Harris, in fact, was the one who recommended him to
>> legendary producer Alfred Lion in 1958 which led to Blue Note Sessions.
>>
>> ALOHA
>> Tom
>>
>>
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>


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